Welcome

The Oil Sands Developers Group (OSDG) is a non-profit, industry-funded association, located in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada.

OSDG represents oil sands operators and developers, and works in co-operation with related industries, government, Aboriginal peoples, and other organizations active in the Athabasca oil sands region to define and address regional issues related to oil sands development, and to communicate accurate, credible information about Athabasca oil sands activity.


Ken Chapman, Executive Director

Ken is the Executive Director of the Oil Sands Developers Group.  His focus is on  helping to improve the quality of life in the Wood Buffalo region, ensuring proper environmental stewardship and responsible and sustainable oil sands development.  He works to engage directly with public policy designers and decision makers in all orders of government, local stakeholders, a wide range of industry sectors, environmentalists, scienctists, Aborginal groups and community leaders.

He was a founder of Cambridge Strategies Inc., a public policy consultancy group prior to joining the OSDG in June 2011.  As a lawyer he championed a number of key cases from legalizing midwifery to establishing French language education rights in Alberta.  He is very interested and involved in social media, citizen engagement, and deliberative decocracy issues.  He has an on-going and keen interest in the arts culture, creativity and innovation.  He is recoginized as one of Alberta Ventures 50 Most Influential People in 2010 and received the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal for service to the community.

 

Some interested companies

BlueSky Communication Inc | PR Agency Toronto
90 Sherbourne St Loft 106, Toronto, ON M5A 2R1
(416) 929-2506

Patrick Rocca, Real Estate Agent
103 Vanderhoof Ave, East York, ON M4G 2H5
(416) 258-4351

Purple Bean Media
446 Grey St Unit #302 B, Brantford, ON N3S 7L6
(226) 920-9850

Lightbound 3D Laser Scanning Services
25 Adelaide St E Suite #820, Toronto, ON M5C 3A1
(437) 775-9000

Uptown Yonge Dental
2717 Yonge St, Toronto, ON M4N 2H8
(416) 487-3333

Dezan Social Media Marketing and SEO
1470 Dundas St, London, ON N5W 3B9
(226) 926-6332

Glenn D. Godfrey & Co. LLP
3rd Floor, 35 Barrack Road, Belize City, Belize
+501 223-3530

Scarfone Hawkins Law Firm
1 James St S 14th Floor, Hamilton, ON L8P 4R5
(905) 523-1333

TPI Personal Injury Lawyers
2800 Skymark Ave #503, Mississauga, ON L4W 5A6
(905) 361-1500

Braids & Laces Ltd
Concession Rd 13, Cannington, ON L0E 1E0
(705) 437-1470

HouseMaster Home Inspections Albany NY
16 Hillman Lp, Round Lake, NY 12151, United States
(518) 372-6600

WESCOR Wastewater & Environmental Systems
65 Gerald Pkwy, Thorndale, ON N0M 2P0s
(519) 461-1616

Did you know...

Canada’s oil reserves are second in the world behind Saudi Arabia

Of 179 billion barrels of Canada’s oil reserves, the oil sands represent 97 per cent

For each permanent oil sands-related job, nine additional direct, indirect and induced jobs are created in Canada.

Currently 240,000 jobs in Canada are directly or indirectly linked to the oil sands.

Between 2000 and 2020, oil sands development has the potential to generate at least $123 billion in royalty and tax revenues for Canada’s federal and provincial governments.

The oil sands currently account for only 4.6 per cent of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions. This is less than 0.1 per cent of total global emissions.

Alberta was the first jurisdiction in North America to legislate industrial greenhouse gas emission reductions.

Producers have made great strides in reducing the amount of emissions per barrel of bitumen extracted from the oil sands. The equivalent of 2.6 million tonnes of reductions have been made – the same as taking more than 550,000 cars off the road.

The province of Alberta has committed $4 billion toward climate change initiatives, including $2 billion for public transit and $2 billion for carbon capture and storage (CCS). This is the largest CCS investment in the world.

Air quality around oil sands operations is better than all North American cities reviewed by the Alberta Clean Air Strategic Alliance.

Alberta air quality standards are the most stringent in Canada.

Air quality in Fort McMurray is monitored around the clock. Results are available at the WBEA site.

Air quality has been extensively modeled and demonstrated to remain within Alberta’s strict air quality guidelines even with all projected oil sands development in place.

Oil sands are located below the surface of 140,200 square kilometres of land, 4.5 per cent of Canada’s total boreal forest.

Mineable oil sands only exist under 0.1 per cent of Canada’s total boreal forest.

While disturbance is occurring daily, in more than 40 years oil sands mining has disturbed about one hundredth of one per cent of the Canadian boreal forest – some 500 square kilometres.

Since 2001, coordinated efforts between government and industry through Integrated Landscape Management (ILM) activities have reduced land surface disturbance in the region by 20 per cent.

As required by law, and included in all project approvals, reclamation work is ongoing and continuous in the oil sands. All lands disturbed by oil sands will be reclaimed.

Mining is only an option for oil sands that sit less than 75 metres under the surface.

More than 80 per cent of the oil sands will be developed using in-situ technologies.

In-situ projects resemble conventional oil development and do not require tailings ponds, or mine pits.

In-situ operations create linear disturbance of the surface for wellheads. But new technology and processes, including low-impact seismic and directional drilling, are reducing that footprint.

In Alberta, Alberta Environment regulates oil and gas industry water use under the Water Act. Oil and gas companies are subject to the same conditions for use as any other licensed water user in Alberta.

Currently, the oil sands industry draws less than half the water allocation allowed by Alberta Environment from the Athabasca River.

Water allocations are strictly controlled during low flow periods.

More than 80 per cent of water drawn by industry from the Athabasca is recycled.

Non-potable water which is unsuitable for drinking, livestock or irrigation use is used wherever possible for in-situ production.

Alberta Environment prohibits the release of any water to the Athabasca River that does not meet water quality requirements.

RAMP, a multi-stakeholder body, conducts annual monitoring of the river’s fish species, fish habitat and water quality. The monitoring has not detected significant changes to the Athabasca River. www.ramp-alberta.org

Bitumen from exposed oil sands along the river banks has seeped naturally into the Athabasca River as it cut its way through the landscape.

Tailings contain the water, residual bitumen, sand and clay that is left over when the bitumen is separated from the sand.

In the ponds, the solids separate from the water so the water may be recycled into the process again. Of the total water used by oil sands mines, 80 per cent is recycled.

During and after mining, the tailings ponds are reclaimed. No tailings water is released to the Athabasca River or any other watercourse.

The first tailings ponds will be reclaimed in 2010.

80 per cent of the oil sands resource will be developed using in-situ technology which does not require tailings ponds.

More Facts


Barn Painters Ontario